Monday, June, 17, 2019 01:15:47

The implementation of 3D printing serves the purpose of enabling historians re-create artefacts physically and digitally, raising accessibility and awareness of historical articles.

Reports indicate that Google Arts and Culture is deploying the J750 full color 3D printing system from Stratasys for reconstructing numerous historical monuments under its Open Heritage Project.

The implementation of 3D printing serves the purpose of enabling historians re-create artefacts physically and digitally, raising accessibility and awareness of historical articles. This would also allow the pieces to be more effectively shared and preserved, with files being available for download across the globe.

Bryan Allen, Google’s Design Technologist, said in a statement that while interacting with culture and arts preservationists, museum curators, and historians, all expressed amazement at the ability of fabricating things through 3D printing technology with such high fidelity.

Allen mentioned that the Open Heritage Project was aimed at attempting to physically make these artefacts with the purpose of getting people excited and hooked on seeing places in research context or a museum. That was the point when Google Arts and Culture turned towards 3D printing, he stated.

New range of 3D printing materials are capable of delivering higher finish, better colors, as well as more robust mechanical properties. This assists in getting very close to the final product and realistic prototypes right off the machine, Allen added.

Enterprise Product Director of Rapid Prototyping at Stratasys, Rafie Grinvald, was quoted saying that the J750 system allows designers to truly achieve their ultimate goal, which is to match the final 3D print with what was seen on the screen initially.

Grinvald continued that by combining translucency and rich colors in a single print, engineers and designers could develop models with higher levels of realism and accuracy, mirroring transparent or opaque structures, as well as complex materials such as rubber. He believes the company’s relation with Google Arts and Culture perfectly demonstrates that 3D printing pays off, with models which feel and look real.