Monday, August, 19, 2019 07:20:24
  • The company would combine hydrogen from the proposed plant with carbon dioxide from other processes to manufacture renewable methanol
  • The final decision to manufacture renewable methanol would be announced later this year

Gas infrastructure firm Gasunie and specialty chemicals company Nouryon have reportedly agreed to supply green hydrogen to Netherlands-based methanol manufacturer BioMCN to produce renewable methanol from carbon dioxide. As per trusted sources, the production of renewable methanol marks the next step in the sustainability of processes in the sector.

Reportedly, Gasunie and Nouryon are presently evaluating the possible conversion of sustainable power into green hydrogen by utilizing a 20 MW eater electrolysis unit in Delfzijl. Sources familiar with the development claim that the final call on the project is slated to be announced later this year.

Managing Director at Gasunie New Energy, Gerard van Pijkeren was reportedly quoted saying that the gas infrastructure plays a facilitating and connecting role in the overall energy transition. Both the companies would be transporting several different energy carriers, such as green gas and hydrogen, increasingly through their pipelines in the future, Gerard further added.

Managing Director of Industrial Chemicals at Nouryon, Knut Schwalenberg reportedly commented that green hydrogen can be rightly termed as the ideal substitute for fossil-based raw materials and allows the creation of new forms of green chemistry. The new deal between Nouryon and Gasunie would assist in supporting long-term growth in the energy industry, Schwalenberg further added.

According to a press release from Nouryon, BioMCN would combine hydrogen from the proposed plant with carbon dioxide from other processes to manufacture renewable methanol.

Managing Director of BioMCN, Søren Jacobsen reportedly said that the collaboration is a significant step toward facilitating a circular economy. Owing to the supply of green hydrogen, firms can now substitute natural gas as a feedstock and recycle CO2 emissions to manufacture new fuels and raw materials.